Schedule

Tab through the schedule to view the day’s program, including all of the session and tour descriptions.
The conference is entirely SOLD OUT. No tickets will be sold at the door.

8:15 a.m.

Walk-on registration, coffee and pastry at Watch Hill Chapel

9:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

at Watch Hill Chapel

Greetings from
Senate Minority Leader Dennis L. Algiere
Edith Eglin, President, Watch Hill Chapel Society
Deborah Royce, Owner/Founder, Ocean House
Edward F. Sanderson, Executive Director, RIHPHC
Valerie Talmage, Executive Director, Preserve Rhode Island

The Economics of Historic Preservation – Recent Lessons from the U.S. and Beyond

Donovan D. Rypkema, Principal, PlaceEconomics
Introduced by Maia Farish, Roger Williams University

Historic preservation has aesthetic, cultural, educational, symbolic, environmental, and even spiritual values, but lately, advocates have turned their focus to measuring its economic value. Research has demonstrated the significant economic impact of preservation on property values, job creation, tourism revenues, and downtown revitalization. And recent studies have shown historic districts to be magnets for the knowledge and creative industries, for start-up businesses, and for walkability. During the depths of the recession foreclosure rates were demonstrably less in historic districts, and the recovery came sooner and stronger.

Donovan D. Rypkema will share some of his recent research and introduce metrics to be applied in a forthcoming study of the links between historic preservation and Rhode Island’s economy. Working with Preserve Rhode Island and the Preservation Society of Newport County, Rypkema will look at the role of historic preservation as an economic and community development tool that can support Rhode Island’s growth statewide.

Donovan D. Rypkema is principal of PlaceEconomics, a Washington, D.C.-based real estate and economic development-consulting firm and president of the companion firm, Heritage Strategies International. Both firms work at the intersection of historic preservation, real estate, and economics, with public and non-profit sector clients in 49 states and nearly 50 countries. A graduate of the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University, Donovan teaches a course on the economics of historic preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of several publications including The Economics of Historic Preservation: A Community Leader’s Guide which is used by preservationists nationwide and has been translated into Russian and Korean. In 2012 Donovan received the Louise du Pont Crowninshield Award, the highest national recognition for achievement in historic preservation, presented by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

10:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

A1 The Big Picture: Historic Preservation and Economic Development

Trudy Coxe, CEO and Executive Director, The Preservation Society of Newport County
Deborah Royce, Owner/Founder, Ocean House
Donovan Rypkema, Principal, PlaceEconomics
Edward F. Sanderson, Executive Director, RIHPHC
Scott Wolf, Executive Director, Grow Smart Rhode Island

In Westerly, individual projects at The Ocean House, Weekapaug Inn, Lanphear Livery Stable, United Theatre, Savoy Bookstore, Nardone Motors, Grey Sail Brewing of RI, and the new Westerly Education Center are revitalizing neighborhoods; collectively they represent significant economic development in southern Rhode Island. In Newport, 650,000 visitors to the Mansions in 2013 generated $76 million in local spending in 2013; imagine the impact in 2016, when more than a million visited the Mansions. Join this panel of local, state, and national experts to discuss how local investments are building blocks of the state economy.

A2: Letting History Out of the Box

Marisa Angell Brown, ‎Assistant Director of Programs, ‎John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, Brown University
Joelle Kanter, Program Manager, The Providence Foundation
Caroline Stevens, Director, Doors Open Rhode Island
Sarah Zurier, Historian, RIHPHC

Some of the most innovative trends in heritage tourism and historic preservation are no-tech and communal. Introducing Jane’s Walk, a worldwide movement of citizen-led walking tours inspired by urbanist Jane Jacobs. Meet Doors Open Rhode Island, an architectural matchmaker connecting people and places. Get to know Hacking Heritage, Rhode Island’s cultural heritage unconference that fosters broad participation and provocative ideas. And engage in an unconference-format discussion about…well, we’ll leave that up to you.

A3 Green-Tinted Glasses: A New Vision for Historic Parks

Jeff Emidy, Deputy Director, RIHPHC
Lisa Lawless, RIHPHC Commissioner and Supervising Civil Engineer, RI-DEM
Wendy Nilsson, Superintendent of Parks, Providence Parks Department
Jennifer Pereira, Director of Grant Programs, Rhode Island Foundation

Rhode Island’s landmark parks are having a moment in the sun. A $10 million campaign to preserve and enhance Roger Williams Park in Providence is producing significant improvements to infrastructure, programming, and use. A new report on outdoor recreation in Rhode Island has highlighted how parks from Fort Adams State Park to Lincoln’s Chase Farm have an impact on public health and the state economy. Participate in a conversation with state and city leaders on policy-making, advocacy, marketing, marketing, programming, and preservation of our treasured historic parks.

A4 Climate Change and Our Landscapes: The South Coast

Janet Freedman, Coastal Geologist, R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council
Timothy Ives, Archaeologist, RIHPHC
Pierre Morenon, Professor of Anthropology, Rhode Island College
Joseph Waller Jr., Senior Archaeologist, PAL

Take a “deep time” look at how 20,000 years of climate change has shaped cultural landscapes along Rhode Island’s South Coast. Learn from an often disregarded repository of environmental history – the soil itself.  Review an archaeological survey of coastal sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy to consider the diversity and vulnerability of an ancient heritage threatened by sea-level rise. And get an update from the state’s Coastal Resources Management Council, which is charged with helping protect life and property from damage associated with sea-level rise and increasingly frequent and intense storms.

A5 To the Lighthouse (and Back): Watch Hill Lighthouse WALKING TOUR

Paul Dewey, Board of Directors, Watch Hill Lighthouse Keepers Association
Ann Snowden Johnson, President, Watch Hill Lighthouse Keepers Association
Peter McCormick, Treasurer, Watch Hill Lighthouse Keepers Association

Built of Westerly granite, the Watch Hill Lighthouse (1855-56) is the third beacon to light treacherous Watch Hill Point. The light station also includes the keeper’s house, oil house, garage, and fog signal building—all under the stewardship of the Watch Hill Lighthouse Keepers Association since 1986. View artifacts (including the Fourth Order Fresnel lens), hear tales of brave keepers, and learn what it takes to preserve this sea-battered historic place. This tour includes 1/2-mile walks to and from the lighthouse.

A6 Cottage Colony 1 WALKING TOUR

Jack Renshaw, Principal, Clifford M. Renshaw Architects
Rich Youngken, Preservation Consultant and co-author of Watch Hill Style

Large resort hotels defined the Watch Hill landscape until the 1880s, when wealthy urbanites began to build private summer homes overlooking the sea. Much of the early cottage colony remains intact as part of the Watch Hill Historic District, listed on the National Register in 1985. This tour along Bluff Avenue and Lighthouse Road will survey some of Watch Hill’s distinctive late 19th-century and early 20th-century resort architecture and discuss historic preservation challenges, compatible design for infill and additions, and the economics of historic preservation.

A7 Scenes on the Pawcatuck BOAT TOUR

Joanna Doherty, Architectural Historian, RIHPHC
Harvey Perry II, Honorary Trustee, Rhode Island Chapter of the Nature Conservancy

The Pawcatuck River defines the border of Stonington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode Island but also connects the two communities in a long shared history. As you cruise upriver, learn about historic uses of the land and water, farming, fishing, shipbuilding, industrial development, summer resorts, and recreation. Highlights include Watch Hill residences perched on the bluffs, the city of granite monuments at River Bend Cemetery, Avondale, the Perry Homestead and Mechanic Street Historic Districts, boatyards, factories, and a glimpse of Downtown Westerly. [Same as B7]

12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Lunch for attendees in Sessions A1 – A7

11:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

These sessions are 2 hours long and include lunch on site.
Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

A8 The North Side of the Tracks: North End BUS TOUR with lunch

Jennifer Brinton, Owner, Grey Sail Brewing of Rhode Island (invited)
Blanche Higgins, Community Planner
Jason Mancini, Director, Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center
Chris White, Board Member, Greater North End Community Development

This tour will explore Westerly’s North End, which encompasses several workers’ neighborhoods with a complex ethnic history. Revitalization is in progress, with many private, public, and neighbor-led projects. See the mill villages of Stillmansville and White Rock; a 150-year old African-American and Narragansett Indian church; the Jonnycake Center; new parks; and the area’s signature granite masonry built by Italian and Narragansett Indian craftsmen. Lunch is served in the former Cataldo residence, now the Tap Room of Grey Sail Brewing of Rhode Island—next to the Westerly Macaroni Factory (ca. 1929) where Grey Sail is brewed.

A9 Literary Landmark: Westerly Library and Wilcox Park BUS TOUR with lunch

Brigitte Hopkins, Executive Director, Westerly Library and Wilcox Park
Elena Pascarella, ASLA, Principal, Landscape Elements
Alan Peck, Superintendent, Wilcox Park

Westerly Library and Wilcox Park are the heart of Downtown Westerly. This tour will showcase the historic Romanesque Revival-style library and reveal the park’s historic landscape design, specimen trees, and collection of monuments and markers. The library and park were recently designated as Rhode Island’s first Literary Landmark, recognizing their stewardship of the legacy of beloved children’s book author Margaret Wise Brown.

A10 Babcock-Smith House Museum BUS TOUR with lunch

Docents, Babcock-Smith House Museum

The ca. 1734 Babcock-Smith House Museum is witness to nearly three centuries of Westerly history. Explore the house’s colonial past, the property’s role as the birthplace of the local granite industry, and the 1928 restoration by architect Norman Isham. And don’t miss the collection of furniture made in Rhode Island between 1720 and 1810. Can’t get enough granite or furniture? Follow up this tour with B9 (Built from Stone BUS TOUR) or C2 (Continuum of Craft).

2:00 – 3:15 p.m.

Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

B0 One Moore Tour (SOLD OUT)

Desa D. Buffum and James C. Buffum, Hosts/Realtors, Mott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty
Robert Stack, AIA, Executive Director, Mid-Century Modern Rhode Island

This very special tour visits Westerly’s Klotz House, described by William Jordy as “probably the single most important modernist house built in Rhode Island during the 1960s.” Its architect Charles Moore would go on to win the AIA Gold Medal (for impact on the field of architecture), AIA Topaz Medallion (for teaching and scholarship), and the AIA 25-Year Award for Sea Ranch Condominium I. Moore’s boldly geometric design for the Klotz House undulates and unfolds on its hilltop site. The inviting interior features vaulted ceilings, cypress wood walls, multiple levels, and an array of windows that look out over woods and water. Explore this modern masterpiece, outside and in.

B1 Rhode Island’s Creative and Cultural Economy

Amber Caulkins, Director, The College & University Research Collaborative
Liz Keithline, State Cultural Facilities Grants, R.I. State Council on the Arts
Francis Leazes, Jr., Professor of Political Science, Rhode Island College
Stacey Springs, Investigator in Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University
Sarah Zurier, Historian, RIHPHC
William Zywiak, Lecturer in Mathematics, Bryant University

After Rhode Island voters approved the $35 million Creative and Cultural Economy Bonds in 2014, the R.I. State Council on the Arts engaged The College & University Research Collaborative’s team of academic researchers to measure the impact of investments in arts, culture, and heritage infrastructure. Learn about their findings, and get motivated to submit a State Cultural Facilities Grant application or a State Preservation Grant application for your organization’s capital project in 2017.

B2 Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of Rhode Island’s Economy

Gerald Carbone, Author, Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of American Industry (forthcoming)
Edward F. Sanderson, Executive Director, RIHPHC
Anthony J. Thomas Jr., Principal and Partner, The Foundry

From its origins as a clockshop to its emergence as the world’s largest producer of precision machinery, machine tools, and measuring devices, Brown & Sharpe shaped Rhode Island’s economy and American industrial capitalism. After 88 years, the Providence plant shut down in 1964, and the empty 25-acre complex in sight of the State House became an emblem of the state’s decline. Gradually—and now completely—reused for offices and apartments, the Foundry demonstrated that historic preservation could drive economic development in post-industrial Rhode Island. Speakers will reflect on the expansive legacy of Brown & Sharpe.

B3 Law and Order: HDC

Jeff Emidy, Deputy Director, RIHPHC
Jason Martin, Preservation Planner, City of Providence
Andrew Teitz, Partner, Ursillo, Teitz & Ritch

In the Historic District Commission justice system, there are two sides – the petitioners for Certificates of Appropriateness and the volunteer commissioners who approve or deny them. In this session, we present preservation law for non-lawyers. We will learn from a lawyer and HDC staff members how to conduct a lawful meeting, what the law actually allows HDCs to do, and tips for making sure that the law is on your side, whether you are a petitioner or a commissioner.

B4 Climate Change and Our Landscapes: Block Island

Kevin McBride, Director of Research, Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center
Bryan Oakley, Assistant Professor of Environmental Geoscience, Eastern Connecticut State University
David Robinson, Marine Archaeologist, University of Rhode Island – Graduate School of Oceanography

Climate change has shaped cultural landscapes on Block Island for thousands of years. Hear how the study of an ancient forest floor (now submerged off West Beach) allows researchers to reconstruct the coastal environments of the island’s original inhabitants–the Manissee. Review an archaeological survey of coastal sites damaged by Hurricane Sandy to understand the diversity and vulnerability of a heritage imminently threatened by sea-level rise. And learn how the Beach Special Area Management Plan uses cutting-edge technologies and survey methodologies to project the movement of shorelines over time.

B5 The Queen of Watch Hill: Ocean House WALKING TOUR

Edith Eglin, Resident
Virginia Hesse, Principal Historic Architect, RIHPHC
Colin Kane and Jordan Stone, Principals, Peregrine Group
Nicholas Moore, In-House Counsel to Chuck Royce
Jefferson B. Riley, FAIA, Partner, Centerbrook
Deborah Royce, Founder/Owner
Donna and Grant Simmons, Investors

Built in 1868, Ocean House welcomed guests summer after summer until the endangered building was shuttered in 2003. New owners rebuilt Ocean House in consultation with preservationists and local experts, reusing any granite cobble, wood trim, or piece of furniture that could be salvaged. Today’s Ocean House offers five-star accommodations in a space that preserves the spirit of the old hotel. Our all-star cast of guides will lead small group tours of this grand hotel.

B6 Cottage Colony 2 WALKING TOUR

Jack Renshaw, Principal, Clifford M. Renshaw Architects
Rich Youngken, Preservation Consultant and co-author of Watch Hill Style

Large resort hotels defined the Watch Hill landscape until the 1880s, when wealthy urbanites began to build private summer homes overlooking the sea. Much of the early cottage colony remains intact as part of the Watch Hill Historic District, listed on the National Register in 1985. This tour along Niantic, Ninigret, and Wauwinnet avenues and Westerly and Watch Hill roads will survey some of Watch Hill’s distinctive late 19th-century and early 20th-century resort architecture and discuss historic preservation challenges, compatible design for infill and additions, and the economics of historic preservation.

B7 Scenes on the Pawcatuck BOAT TOUR

Chris Kepple, Development Coordinator, Stonington Historical Society
Dave Prescott, South County Coastkeeper, Save the Bay

The Pawcatuck River defines the border between Stonington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode Island but also connects the two communities in a long shared history. As you cruise upriver, learn about historic uses of the land and water, farming, fishing, shipbuilding, industrial development, summer resorts, and recreation. Highlights include Watch Hill residences perched on the bluffs, the city of granite monuments at River Bend Cemetery, Avondale, the Perry Homestead and Mechanic Street Historic Districts, boatyards, factories, and a glimpse of Downtown Westerly. [Same as A7]

3:15 – 3:45 p.m.

Break for attendees in Sessions B0 – B7

2:00 – 5:00 p.m.

These tours are 3 hours long. If you choose one of these tours, you will not be able to attend a C session.
Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

B8 The Big Picture: Downtown Westerly BUS TOUR

Dennis L. Algiere, Senate Minority Leader and Senior Vice President, The Washington Trust Company
Simon Holt, Executive Director, United Theatre
Daniel King, Executive Director, Royce Family Fund
Thomas J. Liguori, Jr., Esq., House Counsel, Cherenzia Companies
Kelly Presley, Executive Director, Westerly Land Trust

An influx of new construction and historic rehabilitations is transforming and revitalizing Downtown Westerly. What’s new? The Savoy Bookshop in the former Savoy Hotel (1888) and the Westerly Education Center (2017), where students train to build electric submarines. What old favorites are coming back to life? The Knickerbocker Music Center (1933) and the United Theatre (1926). And what knits it together? Wilcox Park and Westerly Library, civic buildings and churches, enduring institutions like The Washington Trust Company, and many mom-and-pop businesses. Walk and talk, talk, talk with a crew of local visionaries.

B9 Built from Stone: Westerly Granite and Granite Westerly BUS TOUR

Linda Smith Chaffee, whose family owned Smith Granite Company
John B. Coduri, whose family owned Joseph Coduri Granite Company
Ellen L. Madison, Ph.D., whose family owned Richard Opie Granite Company

Join the three authors of Built from Stone: The Westerly Granite Story (2011) for a talk and tour that examines the Westerly granite industry from its beginnings in 1846 to the present. Learn about the individual craftspeople, entrepreneurs, and various ethnic groups who contributed to the story. Stops will include a walking tour of downtown Westerly and a second walking tour of significant monuments in River Bend Cemetery.

B10 Scenes from Charlestown BUS TOUR

Anne Doyle, Archivist, Quonochontaug Historical Society
Pam Lyons, President, Charlestown Historical Society
Charlotte Taylor, Archaeologist, RIHPHC

Sample three distinct Charlestown places with an archivist, an advocate, and an archaeologist. First stop is Quonochontaug (also known as “Quonnie”), an agricultural area that evolved into a summer resort community at the turn of the century. Next up is Fort Ninigret, a settlement of the Niantic/Narragansett for centuries that evolved into a fortified trading and manufacturing center in the 17th century. Last stop is the village of Cross Mills to visit the restored 1838 schoolhouse and museum of town history. In between, take in the roadside architecture of U.S. Route 1 and rural scenes along back roads.

3:45 – 5:00 p.m.

Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

C0 Another Moore Tour (SOLD OUT)

Desa D. Buffum and James C. Buffum, Hosts/Realtors, Mott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty
Robert Stack, AIA, Executive Director, Mid-Century Modern Rhode Island

This very special tour visits Westerly’s Klotz House, described by William Jordy as “probably the single most important modernist house built in Rhode Island during the 1960s.” Its architect Charles Moore would go on to win the AIA Gold Medal (for impact on the field of architecture), AIA Topaz Medallion (for teaching and scholarship), and the AIA 25-Year Award for Sea Ranch Condominium I. Moore’s boldly geometric design for the Klotz House undulates and unfolds on its hilltop site. The inviting interior features vaulted ceilings, cypress wood walls, multiple levels, and an array of windows that look out over woods and water. Explore this modern masterpiece, outside and in.

C1 Historic Sacred Places and the Economic Halo Effect

Tuomi Joshua Forrest, Executive Vice President, Partners for Sacred Places
Katy Pomplun, Grants Coordinator, RIHPHC
Dyan Vaughan, Co-Chair of Historical Properties Collection, First Congregational Church in Bristol

Did you know that the average historic church, synagogue, or mosque in an urban environment generates more than $1.7 million annually in economic impact? Have you heard about the National Fund for Sacred Places, a $10 million matching grant program that funds capital projects at historic houses of worship? Learn how to make the case to policy-makers and funders that your historic sacred place contributes to the local economy, and discover how this new grant program can assist your congregation. And hear about grant opportunities specifically for historic sacred places in Rhode Island.

C2 A Continuum of Craft: Architecture, Furniture, and Historic Preservation

Caryne Eskridge, Marcia Brady Tucker Fellow, Yale University Art Gallery
Jeffrey Greene, Furniture-maker and Owner, The Ball & Claw
Margot Nishimura, Deputy Director of Collections, Programming, and Public Engagement, Newport Restoration Foundation

Preserving buildings and collecting furniture have been tandem pursuits since the historic preservation movement began. Inspired by the recent landmark exhibit Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830 at the Yale University Art Gallery, this panel will highlight the historic connections between house carpentry and furniture-making.  Join us to learn how local museums are using this exciting new research on Rhode Island furniture to retell their stories and engage in the continuum of craft.

C3 Preservation U: Recent University Projects

Marisa Angell Brown, ‎Assistant Director of Programs, ‎John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, Brown University
Students and faculty from Brown University, RISD, Roger Williams University, Salve Regina University, and URI

Students at Rhode Island’s colleges and universities are expanding and redefining the field of historic preservation. Topics include a potential program in Historic Real Estate Finance, architectural visions for Newport’s Point neighborhood in 2050/2100, the history of mobile and prefab structures in Providence, Historic American Landscape Survey documentation of Westerly’s Wilcox Park, stone conservation at The Breakers in Newport, and the architecture of sacred places.

C4 Climate Change Reality BOAT TOUR

Janet Freedman, Coastal Geologist, R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council
Timothy Ives, Archaeologist, RIHPHC
Bryan Oakley, Assistant Professor of Environmental Geoscience, Eastern Connecticut State University

Depart from Watch Hill Cove for a short journey across the waters of space and time. View the iconic and ever-changing shores of Napatree Point and (perhaps as far as) Watch Hill Point as your guides discuss the challenges of historic preservation and coastal management in light of climate change projections.

C5 Street Smart: Bay Street WALKING TOUR

Sharon Ahern, Executive Director, Watch Hill Conservancy
Gary Anderson, Artist and Carousel Restorer, Anderson Artworks

Bay Street is Watch Hill’s Main Street, dotted with shops, restaurants, monuments, and green spaces opposite the cove. Though the commercial corridor has been updated, it retains several key anchors that retain the feel of the historic seaside resort, such as the Flying Horse Carousel (1876), Olympia Tea Room (1939), Ninigret sculpture (1914), Ridley Watts Memorial (1940), and newly rehabbed Lanphear Livery Stable (1887). Local experts will discuss streetscape improvements, burial of utility lines, seasonal businesses, and other projects and challenges as you walk Bay Street.

C6 The Only Thing Constant is Change: Napatree Point WALKING TOUR

Janice Sassi, Manager, Napatree Point Conservation Area
Rich Youngken, Preservation Consultant and Co-author of Watch Hill Style

Once a heavily wooded peninsula (a nape of trees), Napatree Point was swept clean by the Gale of 1818, then was developed as the site of a coastal fortification (Fort Mansfield) and summer cottages, and was swept clean again by the Hurricane of 1938. Today, the 1.5-mile sandy spit of land is a wildlife preserve and beach protected by the Watch Hill Fire District and the Watch Hill Conservancy. As you walk the beach, learn about Napatree’s role in the historical development of Watch Hill and about stewardship challenges for managing this fragile and ever-changing landscape. Strenuous walking—please wear shoes suitable for the sandy beach.

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

at One Bay Street Center

For information on past Rhode Island Statewide Historic Preservation Conferences, visit www.preservation.ri.gov/conference.

Contact Info

Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission 150 Benefit Street Providence, RI 02903 401-222-2078 email: ripresconf@gmail.com