Agenda

 

Click on the tabs to view each day’s program, including all of the session and tour descriptions. 

If you need assistance or wish to pay by check, contact Janet at 401-222-2078.

On-site registration will be available at the door. Look for the Registration table at Doorley Municipal Building, 444 Westminster St (4/26-27, 7am-3pm) and at Round Top Center at Beneficent Congregational Church 300 Weybosset St (4/28, 8am-noon).

We will update this form within 24 hours of an event selling out. Check the website for updates: additional spots on SOLD OUT events may open up due to cancellations or the addition of more guides.

Thursday, April 26

Morning

7:30 a.m. –

Walk-in registration, coffee and pastry at Doorley Municipal Building, 444 Westminster St., Providence.

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Welcome

at Doorley Municipal Building, 444 Westminster Street, Providence

Greetings from 
Mayor Jorge O. Elorza, City of Providence
Marta V. Martínez, Executive Director, Rhode Island Latino Arts
Jeffrey D. Emidy, Acting Executive Director, R.I. Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission

Keynote Address

Latinx Public Histories in Hard Times

Dr. Stephen Pitti, Professor of American Studies, History, and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, Yale University
Introduced by Dr. Sarah Zenaida Gould, Co-Chair, Latinos in Heritage Conservation

As residents of the United States call for better futures, and as new political collectivities develop from coast to coast, struggles over historical representations have become increasingly important to Latinas and Latinos nationwide. Monument debates, textbook controversies, preservation campaigns, and memorialization efforts now define our politics, and these contests over the past shape how Americans understand the twenty-first century, their communities, and demands for social change.

Dr. Stephen Pitti is the author of The Devil in Silicon Valley: Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Northern California (2003) and American Latinos and the Making of the United States (2012). He is a former member of the National Park Service advisory board, for which he chaired the National Historic Landmarks committee and served on the Latino scholars panel. As a public historian he advised the Peabody Award–winning series “Latino Americans” on PBS and the Latino Americans: 500 Years of History project organized by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. He is an editor for the Politics and Culture in Modern America book series at the University of Pennsylvania Press and a member of the editorial board of the U.S. Latino Oral History Journal. He chaired a White House committee on LGBT history in 2014; he has worked with secondary school teachers and high school students around the country; and he serves on the board of directors of Freedom University in Atlanta, a school founded to serve undocumented residents of Georgia. He has also contributed expert reports to ongoing court cases in Arizona related to both immigration and ethnic studies.

9:30 – 9:45 a.m.

9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

National State of Preservation in Underrepresented Communities

Chair: Dr. Sarah Zenaida Gould, Co-Chair, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Eduardo Diaz, Director, Smithsonian Latino Center
Belinda Faustinos, American Latino Scholars Expert Panel
Dr. Michelle Magalong, Executive Director, Asian & Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation

Examine national trends and urgent issues in heritage conservation in underrepresented communities. Exchange current challenges, opportunities, and success stories along with ideas for how local communities can influence national outcomes and achieve equity in heritage conservation.

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

View from the East Coast

Moderator: Ed Torrez, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Sarah Aponte, Chief Librarian of CUNY Dominican Studies Institute and Associate Professor, The City College of New York Libraries
Elena Martinez & Bobby Sanabria, Co-Artistic Directors, Bronx Music Heritage Center
Diego Robayo, Spanish Language Fellow, Historic Districts Council (NYC)

Examine trends and urgent issues regarding Latino heritage conservation in the Northeast. Topics include tangible and intangible heritage as it relates to Latinos’ histories and stories set in urban environments. Gain insights on working with allied organizations and finding new resources, volunteers, grants, and crowd-source funding.

Afternoon

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Lunch on your own. Providence has many delicious lunch spots–check out this list of local Latino restaurants from Rhode Island Latino Arts, and these Downtown restaurants from Go Providence.

2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Next Gen Preservation

Facilitator: Josephine S. Talamantez, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Maite Arce, President & CEO, Hispanic Access Foundation
Michelle McVicker, Inaugural Advisory Council on Historic Preservation-Smithsonian Cultural Heritage Fellow
Zulmilena Then, Founder, Preserving East New York

Next generation preservationists will discuss their efforts to conserve tangible and intangible Latino sites and environments worthy of protection. Panelists will consider how Latino cultural resources contribute to the nation’s historical narrative, what challenges emerge in working with traditional preservation methodologies, and how to adopt new strategies and preservation practices.

3:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Power Session

Facilitator: Moira Nadal, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Manuel G. Galaviz, Hispanic Access Foundation Fellow
Norma Hartell, Hispanic Access Foundation Fellow
Ashleyann Pérez-Rivera, Hispanic Access Foundation Fellow

Panelists will exchange recent experiences researching and advocating for Latino historic sites across the country. Get to know specific places of historic importance to Latinos in the US, and learn more about their current preservation status. Discussion will include the specific challenges associated with nominating and protecting Latino historic places.

5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Welcome Reception SOLD OUT

The Providence Preservation Society welcomes Encuentro to Providence. Kick off the conference in one of Providence’s most interesting adaptive reuse projects, and get to know some of Providence’s most ardent preservationists. Space is limited: spots available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Sponsored by Providence Preservation Society

Friday, April 27

Morning

7:30 a.m. –

Walk-in registration, coffee and pastry at Doorley Municipal Building, 444 Westminster St., Providence.

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Downtown Walk and Visit to Providence City Hall + Galleries SOLD OUT

Micah Salkind, Special Projects Manager, Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism
Jennifer Wilson, Assistant Director, Newell D. Goff Center for Education and Public Programs, Rhode Island Historical Society

Use this morning walk to get oriented to Downtown Providence–the history, the architecture, the coffee shops. And stop in at Providence City Hall (1874-78) to visit the galleries and City Archives. 20 tickets available on a first-come, first-serve basis. 

9:30 – 9:45 a.m.

9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Incorporating Latino Preservation into Academia

Chair: Dr. Antonia Castañeda, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Dr. Monica Muñoz Martínez, Assistant Professor, Brown University
Dr. Autumn Quezada de Tavarez, Associate Professor, Roger Williams University

Speakers will talk about the nexus of Latino scholarship, placemaking, and heritage conservation practice and consider ways to incorporate heritage conservation into Latino Studies. We will discuss the work of scholars whose studies reframe local history, such a new series of State Historical Markers and a traveling exhibition. And we will also consider the national scene with a focus on recent developments in the National Park Service.

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Murals as History and the Challenges of Mural Conservation

Chair: Desiree Smith, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Valerie Aranda, Professor of Studio Art, Georgia College
Sara Delgadillo Cruz, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation
Layqa Nuna Yawar, Artist

Murals–monumental works of art–capture the sentiments, experiences, and observations of their creators and the communities that inspire their artwork. Those created during the Latino Community Mural Movement of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s represent an important moment in U.S. art and social history. Recent years have witnessed efforts to recognize the historic significance of these public works of art and devise strategies for their long-term preservation. This panel will explore efforts to safeguard historic murals in Latino communities throughout the U.S. and lead a discussion about appropriate and effective strategies.

Afternoon

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Lunch on your own. Providence has many delicious lunch spots–check out this list of local Latino restaurants from Rhode Island Latino Arts, and these Downtown restaurants from Go Providence.

2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Reflecting & Debriefing

Facilitator: Sehila Mota Casper, Executive Committee Member, Latinos in Heritage Conservation

Reflect on Encuentro 2018 sessions and revisit conference highlights from the last two days. This session offers an opportunity for dialogue with attendees and sharing insights to bring back to our communities.

3:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

RISD Museum Reception and Curator’s Talk SOLD OUT

Walk with Marta to the RISD Museum for a special visit to From the Loom of a Goddess: Reverberations of Guatemalan Maya Weaving. At the heart of Guatemalan Maya culture lies weaving, a practice symbolically linked to the creation of the world. For more than 2,000 years, Maya women have woven intricate textiles on backstrap looms, and this exhibition celebrates the reverberations of Maya weaving today in southern New England’s thriving Guatemalan-heritage community. 25 spots are available to the first 25 people who sign up. 

Evening

6:30 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

Meet + Greet Reception with Native Gardens Actors

Join us at Trinity Repertory Company, 201 Washington Street, Providence, for a reception and pre-show chat with actors from Native Gardens. Get a sneak peek and the inside scoop on what makes this production tick, including more about the playwright, the director, and the themes. This event is open to the general public.
Co-hosted by Rhode Island Latino Arts and Trinity Repertory Company.

7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Providence at Night Walking Tour

Barbara Barnes, tour guide, Rhode Island Historical Society
Jennifer Wilson, Assistant Director, Newell D. Goff Center for Education and Public Programs, Rhode Island Historical Society

Witness the transformation of the City of Providence as businesses shut down and the lights are turned on. 40 spots available to the first 40 people to sign up.

7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Native Gardens at Trinity Repertory Company

Native Gardens is on stage at Trinity Repertory Company, 201 Washington Street, Providence. Written by Karen Zacarías and directed by Christie Vela, Native Gardens is a comedy that escalates a boundary dispute of four neighbors from gardening into a border war, leaving the audience thinking and reflecting on larger political discussions playing out all across the nation today. Ten free tickets are available to the first ten people who sign up. Or purchase your own ticket by calling Linda Barone at (401)521-1100 x225. Please use “Rhode Island Latino Arts” to receive a group rate. Free tickets are SOLD OUT

Saturday, April 28

Morning

8:00 a.m. –

Walk-in registration, coffee and pastry at Round Top Center, Beneficent Congregational Church, 300 Weybosset Street, Providence.

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Opening Session

at Beneficent Congregational Church, 300 Weybosset Street, Providence

Greetings from
Rhode Island Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea
Marta V. Martínez, Executive Director, Rhode Island Latino Arts
Jeffrey D. Emidy, Acting Executive Director, R.I. Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission

Learning from Latinos in Heritage Conservation: The Long View, the Grassroots, and the Majority-Minority Future (That’s Already Here)

Dr. Ray Rast, Assistant Professor of History, Gonzaga University
Introduced by Dr. Ned Kaufman, author of Place, Race, and Story: Essays on the Past and Future of Historic Preservation (2009)

Founded in 2014, Latinos in Heritage Conservation (LHC) has grown from an idea into a network and now into an organization with national reach. It is exciting to celebrate this growth with friends and allies, but it is equally important to pause and reflect on lessons learned and perspectives gained by several decades of Latina/o preservation advocacy and activism. This talk will consider three perspectives. The “long view” allows us to appreciate our foundations, honor our past struggles, and remember that the pace of progress is not always steady. The view from the “grassroots” reminds us of the source of our strength and the importance of resisting and persisting amidst the tumult of the present moment. Finally, the perspective shaped by our anticipation of a “majority-minority” future (that in many ways is already present) can help us think not only about where we are going, but how we can get there together.

Dr. Ray Rast is an Assistant Professor of History at Gonzaga University. He teaches a variety of courses in U.S. history, and his scholarship focuses on mobility, diversity, and sense of place in the modern American West. He is also a historic preservation advocate, with an emphasis on sites and stories related to Latina/o history. His work as a historical consultant on the César Chávez Resource Study helped lay the foundation for President Obama’s creation of the César E. Chávez National Monument in 2012. As a member of the National Park Service Advisory Board’s Planning Committee from 2010 to 2014, he advocated for a more inclusive approach to the evaluation of significance and integrity. In 2011, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar appointed him to a scholars’ advisory board for the National Park Service’s “American Latino Heritage Initiative.” Before joining the faculty at Gonzaga, Dr. Rast served as an Assistant Professor of History and Associate Director of the Center for Oral and Public History at California State University, Fullerton. He has written several National Register and National Historic Landmark nominations and curated or consulted on several museum exhibitions, and he is a founding member of Latinos in Heritage Conservation.

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

These tours return for lunch at Doorley Municipal Building, 444 Westminster St., Providence.
Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

A1 Downtown Public Art Walking Tour

Micah Salkind, Program Manager, Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, City of Providence
Vanphouthon Souvanasane, Director of Yellow Peril Gallery and Member, Providence Arts in City Life Commission 
Robert Stack, Curator, Yellow Peril Gallery
Yarrow Thorne
, Founder, The Avenue Concept

Providence is a destination for contemporary public art, including painted murals, kinetic sculpture, large-scale photographic portraits, and the PVD Fest—a yearly “multi-arts take-over” of the historic downtown. The works now on display represent efforts of the City, the State, local nonprofit The Avenue Concept, and other organizations and individuals to enliven downtown streets. As the City prepares to unveil its Public Art Master Plan, explore Providence’s public art scene with some of its movers, shakers, and makers.

A2: Chinatown Walking Tour

Jonathan Cortez, American Studies PhD student, Brown University
Angela Yuanyuan Feng
, American Studies PhD Student, Brown University
Julieanne Fontana, Public Humanities MA Student, Brown University
Irene Hope, lifelong member, Beneficent Congregational Church
Mark Tseng-Putterman, American Studies PhD and Public Humanities MA Student, Brown University

Chinatowns in the United States have provided enclaves for immigrants transitioning into American life. Rediscover the history of Providence’s Chinatown which originated on Empire Street in the 1880s and migrated west by the 1910s. Stops include Beneficent Church, the On Leong Merchants Association building, sites connected with past Chinese restaurants, and a new exhibit on Providence’s Chinatown at the State Archives.

A3 Preservation Projects: Westminster Street Walking Tour

Chris Ise, Principal Planner, City of Providence
Roberta Randall, Preservation Architect, RIHPHC
Brent Runyon, Executive Director, Providence Preservation Society
Edward “Ted” Sanderson, former Executive Director, RIHPHC
Clark Schoettle, RIHPHC Commissioner and Executive Director, Providence Revolving Fund

Visit a handful of recent rehab projects that feature in the revitalization of Downtown Providence. This tour focuses on Westminster Street and its fine collection of 19th- and early 20th- century commercial buildings reused as apartments, stores, restaurants, and institutions.

A4 CITY WALK-ing Tour: The Stroll

Phoebe Blake, longtime volunteer, CITY WALK
Alex Ellis, Planner, City of Providence

CITY WALK is on its way—a vision to connect Providence neighborhoods with each other and the city’s ample urban assets by safe and improved walking and biking routes. The first of two CITY WALK-ing Tours focuses on Phase 1 from the Providence River Pedestrian Bridge, now under construction, through the Jewelry District and over I-95 to Friendship Street in Upper South Providence.

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Box lunches for participants on Tours A1-A4 at Doorley Municipal Building

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

These tours are 2 hours long and include lunch on site.
Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

A5 El Corazon de Providence: Latino Cultural Corridor Bus Tour

Marta V. Martínez, Executive Director, Rhode Island Latino Arts
Susanna Prull, Program Manager, Preserve Rhode Island
Rosa Ramirez, Rhode Island Latino Arts Intern and Historic Preservation student, Roger Williams University

This tour will explore the southern stretch of La Broa’ (Broad Street), highlighting the story of a bodega called Fefa’s Market, where Dominican immigrant Josefina Rosario created a home-away-from-home for newcomers to Providence.

 

 

A6 How the Colombians Saved the Textile Industry in Rhode Island Bus Tour

Dr. Robert Billington, President, Blackstone Valley Tourism Council
Diana Figueroa, Rhode Island Latino Arts Intern and Historic Preservation student, Roger Williams University
Anna Cano Morales, Assistant Vice President for Community Equity and Diversity, Rhode Island College

Beginning in the 1960s, Colombians immigrated to the Blackstone Valley to find work in local textile mills. This tour will consider their contributions in context of Rhode Island’s long industrial history, with stops at Pawtucket’s Visitors Center and the Central Falls Mill Historic District and insights from local leaders.

A7 African American College Hill Bus Tour

Keith Stokes, Advisor, Rhode Island Black Heritage Society
Theresa Guzmán Stokes, Managing Director, Rhode Island Black Heritage Society

This tour tells the stories of the African Americans who lived and worked in Providence’s College Hill neighborhood. Sites include the Old Brick School House (1769), Congdon Street Baptist Church (1874-75), Old State House (1760-62), University Hall (1770), Market House (1775), and First Baptist Church (1774-75).

A8 Immigrant City: Smith Hill Bus Tour

Dr. Morgan Grefe, RIHPHC Commissioner and Executive Director, Rhode Island Historical Society
Dr. Keith Morton, Professor of Public and Community Services Studies, Providence College

Explore a neighborhood that has welcomed waves of newcomers for two centuries. Immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe, Armenia, Ireland, Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Dominican Republic, and other countries have made their homes in the densely built-up blocks of Smith Hill. This tour will showcase some of the key building types of the historic immigrant city: worker cottages and triple deckers, factories, schools, and houses of worship.

A9 Olneyville/Woonasquatucket Bike Tour

Robert E. Azar, AICP, Deputy Director, Providence Department of Planning and Development
Amanda Blevins, Trip Coordinator, Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council
Councilwoman Sabina Matos, City of Providence

Experience some of the city’s best bicycle infrastructure as you pedal down Broadway and tour Olneyville, a majority-Latino neighborhood which has been a landing ground for generations of immigrants. Continue along the Woonasquatucket River past massive mill buildings for a special lunch-time visit to the WaterFire Arts Center, built in 1929 by the U.S. Rubber Company and rehabbed as a multi-use arts center.

Bring your own bicycle, or contact DASH Bicycle to arrange a rental. $75 includes use of bike, helmet, lock/key, delivery, fitting, and pick-up. Let them know you are renting it for Encuentro on April 28.

Afternoon

1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

B1 AS220 Inside/Out Tour

Shey Rivera, Artistic Director/Co-Director, AS220
Lucie Searle, AS220 Real Estate Advisor and RIHPHC Commissioner

AS220 is a creative place and an arts community, an unjuried and uncensored forum for the arts committed to the realization of the creative potential of the people of Rhode Island. Recognized as a national model for socially responsible urban development, AS220 was founded and led by artists. It houses several arts-related programs (including a dance studio, theater, maker space, youth program, a darkroom, a printshop, several galleries, and a stage), a restaurant and bar, and both commercial and artist tenants. Tour AS220’s three rehabbed historic buildings and get to know this creative community and their spaces for making, presenting, and performing art.

B2 A Lost History: Pond Street Walking Tour

Christina Bevilacqua, Exhibitions and Programs Director, Providence Public Library
Taylor Polites, Swearer Center Practitioner in Residence

Urban redevelopment programs of the 1950s-1970s were massive interventions in built environments that had evolved over centuries. Visit the area of Pond Street, on Providence’s west side from Cathedral Square to Hoyle Square, and learn about three different redevelopment programs, the changes they wrought, and the stories of the diverse communities that have been obscured by them.

B3 Talking Statues: Walking Tour

Jonathan Cortez, American Studies PhD student, Brown University
Maria Paula Garcia Mosquera, Public Humanities MA student, Brown University
Janaya Kizzie, Providence Public Library Archivist and Writer
Dr. Timothy Ives, Archaeologist, RIHPHC

Nearly 150 years separate the dedication of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in 1871 and the 2018 sculptures by Peruvian-American sculptor Peruko Ccopacatty in Kennedy Plaza. These artworks bookend an evolving display of artistry, memory, and identity at the heart of Downtown Providence. Join this walking conversation to hear the backstories of the sculptures and to share your perspectives on the role of art in the public sphere.

B4 Dining with History Downtown Walking Tour

Barbara Barnes, Tour Guide, Rhode Island Historical Society
Beverly Pettine, Tour Guide, Rhode Island Historical Society

This walk explores Rhode Island’s dining history and habits. We will spotlight some of the ethnic food traditions that made a home in Downtown Providence.

3:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Break for attendees in Sessions B1 – B4.

1:30 – 5:00 p.m.

These tours are 3.5 hours long. If you choose one of these tours, you will not be able to attend a C tour.
Click on the tabs for a description of each tour.

B5 El Corazon de Providence: The Main Street Melting Pot Bus Tour

Dr. Taino Palermo, Program Director of Community Development and Healthy Communities, Roger Williams University
Susanna Prull, Program Manager, Preserve Rhode Island
Rosa Ramirez, Historic Preservation student, Roger Williams University

La Broa’ (Broad Street) is Providence’s Latino cultural corridor, bustling with restaurants, shops, entertainment, nightlife, public art, and festivals. It has an active street life and a vibrant history as a destination for the Latino community. This tour walks Broad Street north to the Southside Cultural Center.

B6 Blackstone’s Latino Cultural Corridor – Past to Present Bus Tour

Diana Figueroa, Rhode Island Latino Arts Intern and Historic Preservation student, Roger Williams University
Marta V. Martínez, Executive Director, Rhode Island Latino Arts
Tia Ristaino-Siegel, Board Member, Rhode Island Latino Arts

The Blackstone River runs along the main corridor of Broad Street, connecting the cities of Central Falls, Cumberland, and Pawtucket. Along this route is the first settlement of Colombians and Cubans from the 1960s. This tour will take you in-and-out of neighborhoods with a stop at Chocolateville, Cogswell Tower, City Hall, La Galería del Pueblo, and Viola Davis Drive. 

B7 Olneyville/Woonasquatucket Bus Tour

Dilania Inoa, Manton Avenue Project Board Member and Senior Program Manager, Swearer Center, Brown University
Beshka Kandell
, Olneyville resident
Sarah Zurier, Historian, RIHPHC

Bienvenidos a Olneyville, a predominantly Latino neighborhood that has welcomed generations of immigrants. We will walk from Joslin Park to Riverside Park, through historic Atlantic Mills and the Big Top Flea Market, and among the shops of Olneyville Square. Special performance by playwrights of the Manton Avenue Project, a program that empowers young people to unleash their creative voices by working with professional artists to develop original theater.  

B8 West, South, and Elmwood Placemakers Bus Tour

Kim Smith Barnett, Associate Director, Providence Revolving Fund
Stephen Biernacki, Owner, Venture Enterprises
Manuel Cordero, AIA, President and Co-Founder, DownCity Design
Sussy DeLeon, Broker/Owner, RE/MAX New Horizons
Jason Martin, Preservation Planner, City of Providence
Fernando Tavares, Owner, Tavares LLC

Check out dozens of exciting projects on the West Side, South Side, and Elmwood, and speak to the people that make it all happen. Visit a realtor who is restoring an 1875 mansion and a developer who has proposed to rehab a 1921 theatre. Meet an architect who works with young people to create design/build solutions for their communities. And chat with the City’s preservation planner and a preservationist whose revolving fund invests in neighborhood revitalization projects.

B9 La Broa’/Roger Williams Park Bicycle Tour

Gonzalo Cuervo, Chief of Staff, R.I. Department of State and Roger Williams Park Conservancy Board Member
Lauren Drapala, Preservation Consultant and Roger Williams Park Conservancy Board Member

Bike Broad Street from Downtown to Roger Williams Park with two leaders of the new Roger Williams Park Conservancy. La Broa’ is a vibrant cultural and commercial corridor, lined with Latino businesses, homes, and works of art. Historic Roger Williams Park is the people’s park, reinvigorated with new programming, wayfinding, and infrastructure improvements.

Bring your own bicycle, or contact DASH Bicycle to arrange a rental. $75 includes use of bike, helmet, lock/key, delivery, fitting, and pick-up. Let them know you are renting it for Encuentro on April 28.

B10 CITY WALK-ing Tour: The Hike

Jim Barnes, AIA, Professor of Architecture, RISD
Glenn Modica, Project Review Coordinator, RIHPHC
Victoria Wilson, MArch, Member, Providence Historic District Commission

CITY WALK is on its way—a vision to connect Providence neighborhoods with each other and the city’s ample urban assets by safe and improved walking and biking routes. The second CITY WALK-ing Tour highlights Broad Street, City Walk’s Phase 2. From Trinity Square to Roger Williams Park, La Broa’ is a historic route and Providence’s Latino cultural corridor.

3:45 – 5:00 p.m.

Click on the tabs for a description of each session.

C1 Downtown Public Art Walking Tour

Micah Salkind, Program Manager, Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, City of Providence
Vanphouthon Souvanasane, Director of Yellow Peril Gallery and Member, Providence Arts in City Life Commission 
Robert Stack, Curator, Yellow Peril Gallery
Yarrow Thorne, Founder, The Avenue Concept

Providence is a destination for contemporary public art, including painted murals, kinetic sculpture, large-scale photographic portraits, and the PVD Fest—a yearly “multi-arts take-over” of the historic downtown. The works now on display represent efforts of the City, the State, local nonprofit The Avenue Concept, and other organizations and individuals to enliven downtown streets. As the City prepares to unveil its Public Art Master Plan, explore Providence’s public art scene with some of its movers, shakers, and makers.

C2 Reusing Urban Renewal Walking Tour

Sam Coren, American Studies PhD student, Brown University
Will Cornwall, Founder, Friends of Adrian Hall Way

On the heels of B2 A Lost History: Pond Street, this tour investigates several public spaces created by urban renewal projects in the 1950s-1980s. Stops include Westminster Mall, Cathedral Square, Providence Civic Center, and Adrian Hall Way. Ongoing improvements to Adrian Hall Way are the work of a partnership between local skateboarders and the Providence Parks Department.

C3 Preservation Projects: Washington Street Walking Tour

Joelle Kanter, Program Manager, The Providence Foundation
Rachel Robinson, Director of Preservation, Providence Preservation Society
Clark Schoettle, RIHPHC Commissioner and Executive Director, Providence Revolving Fund

Visit a handful of recent rehab projects that feature in the revitalization of Downtown Providence. This tour focuses on Washington Street and historic properties reused for arts, residential, and commercial purposes.

C4 Providence LGBTQ Walking Tour

Angela DiVeglia, Curatorial Assistant, Providence Public Library
Joanna Doherty, Architectural Historian, RIHPHC
Brent Runyon, Executive Director, Providence Preservation Society
Kate Wells, Curator of Collections, Providence Public Library

Survey places associated with Providence’s LGBTQ history and discover the factors that led to Providence being a center of LGBTQ life for the last century. Hear the stories of police raids, civil rights marches, and groundbreaking legal battles, and see the sites where they happened. 

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Closing Reception

at URI Feinstein Providence Campus Gallery, 80 Washington St., Providence